Please check this page regularly for updates. Course draft timetable is available for download; stay tuned for updated descriptions.

Non-RLG Students: For permission to enroll in an RLG course, please bring a completed course add/drop form to the Graduate Administrator.


 

DSR Course Timetable download icon

DSR Courses - Year

RLG1000Y – PhD Method and Theory

M. Hewitt (Fall) and N. Seidman (Spring)
Tuesday 10-12
JHB318
The seminar is the core course of the Department’s doctoral program. It is required of, and limited to, all first year Ph.D. students of the Department. The purpose of the course is to provide doctoral students with a general understanding of the study of religion through constructive engagement with a number of fundamental challenges–theoretical and methodological–that commonly confront researchers in the field. Among the foundational themes to be explored: the ontological specificity of religious phenomena; the peculiarities of religious language, discourse, and worldviews; the varieties of religious institutionalization; the historical transformation and social “embeddedness” of religions; the embodiment of religion; and the constitution of religious selves or actors. To facilitate our seminar engagements with problems of theory, concept-formation, methods, data, and explanation, a number of major interpretive controversies in the study of religion will also be featured.

DSR Courses - Fall

RLG3634 – Scripture and Ritual in Qumran

J. Newman
Mondays 1-3, JHB213

An examination of selected psalms, prayers, and hymns from the Dead Sea Scrolls with an eye to their appropriation of scriptural discourse. Genre issues, social function of these texts in the Qumran community, and continuity with and differences from later Jewish and Christian liturgies also explored.

 

RLG3402 – Reading Buddhist Texts

C. Emmrich
Mondays 2-4, JHB319

With the aim of familiarizing students with texts that have been critical for the development of Buddhist literature across regions, historical periods, and languages, this course offers a close reading of one or more primary texts in translation or in the source language(s). Texts read may include, but are not limited to, sūtras, tantras, jātakas/avadānas, verse, commentarial and scientific literature, historiography, and epigraphy. The focus will be on texts from South or Southeast Asia.

 

RLG2067 – Topics in the Philosophical Study of Religion

S. Goldberg
Tuesdays 12-2, JHB213

A seminar that explores a topic in the philosophical study of religion. Possible topics include: the nature of religious truth; the phenomenology of religion; descriptions of the holy; religion and the meaning of life; God-talk as literal or metaphorical language; naturalizing religious belief. The topic for the 2019 semester will be religion and modern moral philosophy.

 

RLG1200 – MA Method and Theory

J. Harris
Tuesdays 10-12, JHB317

 

RLG3460 – Sanskrit Readings I

L. Obrock
Tuesdays 2-5, JHB317

This course will have students read choice pieces of South Asian literature. While tackling a text in simple Sanskrit from a major literary tradition, Buddhist or Hindu, and discussing it’s content and context, students will learn strategies for translating and interpreting Sanskrit literature.

 

RLG2081 – Foundations in Psychoanalytic Theory and Clinical Practice

M. Hewitt
Tuesdays 2-4, TBD

The basic focus of this seminar will be on the relationship between the therapist/counselor/chaplain/spiritual director and the “patient.” The word “patient” is used rather than “client” because (according to the Oxford English Dictionary) a patient is one who suffers, and who receives care from another. It is this dimension of both suffering and being the recipient of care that lies at the heart of the therapeutic relationship. One of the central themes of this course will focus upon the nature of that relationship, and it is assumed that the therapeutic action takes place in and through the development of the relationship between the therapist and the patient. The spiritual dimension of the therapeutic relationship will also be considered.
Thus the theoretical emphasis of this course is oriented around concepts of healthy selfhood, and related themes of interpersonal action, intersubjectivity and the relational dynamics operative within the therapeutic relationship. Each seminar will have a theoretical and clinical focus: a theoretical paper will be discussed in the context of clinical work. Students are encouraged to bring their own clinical/pastoral experiences to class discussions. Each seminar will bring together both clinical and theoretical work in order that each will inform and illuminate the other. Please note that all discussions of clinical experience will be treated in a respectful and confidential manner.

 

RLG3290 – Words and Worship

S. Coleman
Wednesdays 10-12, JHB213

How are we to analyze the words that Christians use? And how are such words related to ritual forms? We explore techniques for the analysis of texts, while looking at forms of verbal discourse ranging from prayers, speaking in tongues, and citing the Bible to more informal narratives.

 

RLG3555 – The Prophetic Family in Islamic Tradition

S. Virani
Wednesdays 9-11, JHB317

The conception of the ahl al-bayt, the family of the Prophet Muhammad, plays a vital role in Islamic history, thought and piety. In the tashahhud portion of the ritual prayers, Muslims of all persuasions supplicate daily, “O God! Bless Muhammad and his family (āl) as you blessed Abraham and his family.” From the Arabic teachings of the Prophet’s cousin ʿAli and the Shiʿi Imams descended from him, to the legitimacy drawn from their sayyid lineage by Sunni religious and political leaders, from the Persian poetry of countless Muslim mystics to the Indic and Turkish stories about members of the hallowed lineage, this course draws on both primary and secondary sources to explore the significance of the Prophet’s family in the Islamic tradition.

 

NMC2055 – Qu’ran and Its Interpretation

W. Saleh
Wednesdays 2-4, TBD

This course is designed to orient students to the field of contemporary Qur’anic studies through reading and discussion of the text itself (in translation) and of significant European-language scholarship about the Qur’an as well as through examination of the principal bibliographical tools for this subject area.

 

RLG3228 – Social History of the Jesus Movement

J. Kloppenborg
Thursdays 9-12, JHB213

Focus on the social setting of the early Jesus movement in the cities of the Eastern Empire. Topics will include: rank and legal status; age and population structure; patronalia and clientalia; family structure; marriage and divorce; forms of association outside the family; slavery and manumission; loyalty to the empire and forms of resistance; legal and social issues concerning women; taxation; the structure of the economy, and how these issues are variously reflected in documents of the early Jesus movement. Graduate students will be expected to read primary texts in the original languages; knowledge of Greek is essential; knowledge of a modern research language (French, German, or Italian) is necessary.

 

RLG3799 – Problems and Methods in South Asian Religion

K. Ruffle & L. Obrock
Thursdays 2-5, UTM (TBD)

This graduate gateway seminar introduces key concepts, problems, and methods in the study of South Asian religions. A deep engagement with the histories and genealogies of the field will provide the foundation for the course’s dual focus on pedagogical and professional training.

 

RLG3611 –  Hebrew Literature and Religion

H. Fox
Thursdays 12-2pm, Bancroft 313

The themes of Eros and Thanatos will be explored in Aggadic texts from Song of Songs Rabbah. This midrashic text stands halfway in the tradition, both making use of earlier texts and being used by editors of later compilations. These interrelations will be the focus of our study as well as the relationship of the work to Scripture. This course will introduce students to the skills required in reading ancient literature. We will study Midrash Song of Songs with its manuscripts, sources and parallels.The language of instruction is either in Hebrew or English. The assignments may be written either in Hebrew or in English. The texts and most of the readings are in Hebrew.

 

DSR Courses - Winter

RLG3419 – Teaching Buddhist Studies

F. Garrett
Mondays 3-5, JHB213

A review of the field of Buddhist Studies and its pedagogical approaches. Discuss emerging theories and practices relevant to teaching Buddhism in higher education, learn to articulate methodological, thematic, and practical trends in the field, and practice a range of teaching methods.

 

RLG3242 – Christian Asceticism in Late Antiquity

K. Smith
Mondays 2-4, JHB319

Through studies of fasting, sexual renunciation, and other bodily disciplines, this course considers the ways by which ascetic elites and their promoters constructed a Christian ascetic ideal in late antiquity. In surveying the development of Christian asceticism from its Greco-Roman philosophical roots through to the rise of a flourishing monastic movement, our sources will include hagiographies, church histories, letters, sermons, rules, and practical treatises that address various modes and methods of ascetic renunciation. Thematic explorations include ascetic interpretations of the bible, solitary and communal forms of asceticism, asceticism as the basis for conversion and contemplation, asceticism and gender, and the importance of asceticism as a marker of class, status, and authority in the late ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds.

 

RLG3461 – Sanskrit Readings II

A. Rao
Tuesdays 2-4, JHB317
Thursdays 12-2, JHB317

This course will have students read choice pieces of South Asian literature. While tackling a text in Sanskrit from a major literary tradition, Buddhist or Hindu, and discussing its content and context, students will learn strategies for translating and interpreting Sanskrit literature.

 

RLG3190 – Pseudepigraphy

J. Marshall
Tuesdays 12-3, TBD

A seminar examining the phenomenon of falsely claimed and/or attributed authorship in religions of the ancient Mediterranean, mainly Christianity and Judaism. The course examines understandings of authorship and other cultural forms that facilitate or inhibit ancient pseudepigraphy, ancient controversies over authorship, as well as specific pseudepigraphical writings.

 

RLG2064 – Constructing Religion

S. Coleman
Wednesdays 10-12, JHB213

How have different researchers constructed ‘religion’ as their object of study, and are some frameworks simply incompatible with each other? We discuss – but also provide critical assessments of — different theoretical and methodological frameworks.

 

RLG 3653H – Jewish Exegetical Traditions in Antiquity

H. Fox
Thursday 10am-12pm, Bancroft 313

A study of Bible exegesis in Hebrew and translation, illustrating the growth of scriptural traditions in various Jewish sectarian groups and communities. The selection will include Philo and other Hellenistic Jews, the Dead Sea Scrolls, sectarians, mystics, apocalypticists, Pharisees and rabbis. During the second term discussion will focus on the Jewish-Christian polemic ranging from New Testament and rabbinic sources to occasional explorations into church fathers and gnosticism.

 

RLG3241 – Galatians

L. Ann Jervis
Thursday 11am -1pm, Wycliffe College

Seminar designed to enlarge students’ understanding of Paul, of scholarship on Paul, and the letter he wrote to the Galatians. This course is designed both to deepen knowledge about Paul, Pauline scholarship and Galatians; and to sharpen students’ research abilities and to provide an opportunity to prepare a trial thesis proposal. Teaching methods include lectures and seminar leadership. Evaluation is based on class participation and a final project.

 

RLG2072 – Kant’s Theory of Religion

J. DiCenso
Wednesdays 3-5, JHB317

An advanced study of Immanuel Kant’s theory of religion, as developed in major writings such as the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals and Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason. Emphasizes rational ethical criteria as the basis for analyzing the doctrines, symbols, and institutions of historical religions.

 

RLG3744 – Hindu Epics

A. Dhand
Wednesdays 12-2, TBD

Advanced study in specialized topics on Hinduism such as Ramayana in Literature: This course explores how this conception is the result of a historical process by examining documentable transformations in the reception of the Ramayana. Our focus will be on the shift in the classification of the Ramayana from the inaugural work of Sanskrit literary culture (adi-kavya) in Sanskrit aesthetics to a work of tradition (smrti) in theological commentaries, the differences between the Ramayanas ideal of divine kingship and medieval theistic approaches to Ramas identification with Visnu, the rise of Rama worship, and the use of Ramas divinity in contemporary political discourse.

 

RLG3621 – Modern Jewish Thought

K. Green
Wednesdays 2-4, TBD

In 2019-20, the topic of the course will be: the thought of Emil Fackenheim (1916-2003). The course will concentrate on two leading themes in Fackenheim’s thought. First, Fackenheim’s early focus (1945-1967) on revelation as the basis of authentic religion, and the defence of revelation against the challenges of modern thought. And second, Fackenheim’s late focus (1967-2003) on the Holocaust/Shoah as a traumatic singularity in human history, and as a rupture of all traditions.

 

RLG2015 – Comparing Relgions

R. Locklin
Thursdays 10-12, TBD

Few methods have been more foundational to the scholarly study of religion, or more subject to searching criticism, than the practice of comparison. This seminar offers an advanced introduction to comparative method in the contemporary academy by means of a close study of 4-6 significant comparative projects published in the last decade. In the fall term 2016, we will focus on five recent works in philosophy of religion, comparative ethnography, comparative theology, intertextual studies and cognitive science of religion.

 

Other Courses of Interest

ANTHROPOLOGY

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of Anthropology, please visit their website.

 

The following courses are accurate as of August 2019.

 

ANT4059H – Anthropological Understandings of Cultural Transmission

Xie

Fall, Mondays 11-1

Cultural transmission (CT) is the reproduction of information and practices in the forms of ideas, behaviours, and/or materials through social learning among intra-generational individuals, between societies, and from one generation to the next. Therefore, CT is fundamental to human experience. The topic of CT has received increasing interest in many disciplines, such as biology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and education. Anthropologists in all subfields are well-equipped with rich data to contribute to methodological and theoretical building in this field.

The exact contents of this course are tailored to the interest and needs of the students enrolled, thus vary from year to year. Whenever possible, we use case studies from multiple disciplines to help students develop a better understanding of the biological, cognitive, and social foundations for the diversity, continuity and changes in our cultures over generations.

 

ANT6055H – Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood

Napolitano/Daswani

Fall, Tuesdays 10-1

Personhood, subjectivity and human nature lie at the heart of anthropological inquiry: the meaning and relationship of self and other; how representations of human nature have developed and have shaped an imagination of a (Western) anthropos; the tensions between universality, singularity and the multitude; the exchange between humans and non-humans.

This course addresses the place of personhood and subjectivity through debates around themes such as the “Religious Subject”, the “Precarious Subject” and “Beyond-the-Subject”. The goal of the course is to introduce students to theoretical frameworks that have effectively been employed by anthropologists and critical theorists when studying personhood, subjectification and human nature, and also to think them through themes such as colonialism and post-colonialism. This course will be run as a seminar with evaluation based on participation, one oral presentation, weekly reports, and a final paper.

 

ANT6027H – Anthropology of Violence

Krupa

Winter, Tuesdays 2-4

This course examines anthropological approaches to the study of violence. Violence has long been a central focus for anthropological research. One of the overarching ambitions in much of this research has been to make violence meaningful in some respect. Violence can be given meaning in any number of ways. For example, it can be analyzed as being part of a system of exchange, a system of sacrifice, a system of debt, a system of law-making, or a system of signs. More recently, however, studies of violence have started to emphasize the importance of failures in meaning. In this regard, it could be argued that violence describes the limits of the human capacity to give meaning to events.

This course provides an overview of anthropological and related theories of violence. Some of the central theorists considered in the course are Benjamin, Arendt, Derrida, Foucault, and Agamben. The course then situates these theories within the context of ethnographic cases. The varieties of violence considered in these ethnographies range from forms of violence normally associated with small-scale societies (circumcision, tribal warfare, headhunting, witchcraft killings, etc.) to the forms of violence perpetrated by modern states and their citizens (modern warfare, torture, incarceration, rape, police violence, vigilantism, etc.)

 

DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of Art History, please visit their website.

FAH1177H – Architecture of the Umayyads

H. Mostafa
Fall, Thursdays 2-5

FAH1127H – Early Medieval Art

A. Cohen
Winter, Wednesdays 10-1

FAH2038H – Greek & Roman Sculpture

B. Ewald
Winter, Mondays 1-4 pm

 

BOOK HISTORY AND PRINT CULTURE

For information on graduate courses offered by Book History and Print Culture, please visit their website. The following courses are accurate as of June 2019.

 

BKS 1001H – Introduction to Book History

A. Galey

Fall, Mondays 2-5 pm

This foundational course, required for all BHPC students in their first term, will introduce students to basic topics such as the semiotics of the book; orality and writing systems; book production from manuscript to the latest computer technology; the development of printing; the concept of authorship; copyright; censorship; the economics of book production and distribution; libraries and the organization of information; principles of bibliographical description; print in other formats (newspapers, magazines, advertisements, etc.); reading and readership; editorial theory and practice. We will also study many artifacts and tools of the trade in situ through visits to the Massey College Bibliography Room and Coach House Books.

 

CLASSICS

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Classics Department please visit their website.

CLA5022H – Ancient Greek Religion: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives

K. Yu
Fall, Thursdays 1-4

We will conduct close readings of a variegated (and thus selective) set of Greek texts as case studies to illuminate both panhellenic and local religious life: e.g., the Homeric Hymns, the Derveni papyrus, Orphic and Bacchic gold tablets, Epidaurian iamata, curse tablets, epigraphic ritual norms, and Imperial-period treatises and dialogues that reflect critically on the gods and certain practices associated with them (e.g., Lucian and Plutarch). Especial attention will be given to the ways in which the authors and producers of these texts intervened in Greek religious and social imaginaries by mobilizing particular generic and rhetorical conventions to advance distinct representations of myth and ritual. We will also engage secondary readings to interrogate the assumptions bound up in the terms “Greek religion” and the “imaginary” and ask if they are useful categories for making sense of the often divergent discourses and practices that purported to mediate the Greeks and their gods.

 

MAC1000Y – Methods in Mediterranean Archaeology

P. Sapirstein

Full-year TBA

 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Centre for Comparative Literature, please visit their website.

 

The following courses are accurate as of June 2019.

 

JFC5025H – Feminism and Postmodernism: Theory and Practice

B. Havercroft

Fall, Tuesdays 3-5 pm

This course will examine the complex and controversial relationship between feminism and postmodernism, as this encounter is staged in both theoretical and fictional writings. While many of the «canonical» theoretical texts on postmodernism were penned by male scholars (Lyotard, Baudrillard, Vattimo, Hassan, Scarpetta, etc.), who largely ignored questions of feminism, gender, and women’s artistic practices, feminist critics (Jardine, Butler, Suleiman, Nicholson, Yeatman, and others) soon intervened in the debate. As these latter theoreticians demonstrated, many of the notions characterizing postmodern theories and literary texts were in fact concerns common to feminist thought : the crisis of patriarchal master narratives and the ensuing emphasis on localized, small narratives; the criticism of binary, hierarchical oppositions (center/margin, life /art, culture/nature, mind/body, masculine/feminine); the endeavour to privilege the heterogeneous, the plural, and the hybrid; and the problematization of the subject, of representation, and of language. Doubtful as to whether disseminated subjects are capable of agency and effective political action, other feminist scholars (di Stefano, Hartsock) still question the possibilities of constructive intersections between feminism and postmodernism. Drawing on the principal feminist theories in the postmodern debate, we will study the contentious theoretical issues outlined above, before turning to an analysis of an international corpus of postmodern literary narratives written by women, which construct « strategic subjectivities » (Kaplan) and « forms of common action » (Mouffe), combining ethical perspectives and aesthetic experimentation. Our close readings of these texts will pay careful attention to textual devices typical of postmodern texts (see Hutcheon), such as the extensive use of intertextuality, the recycling and rewriting of mythological, religious, and historical figures and events, the questioning of major binary oppositions underpinning Western thought, genre hybridity, the representation of the author in the text, and so on.

 

JGC1855H – Critical Theory – The French-German Connection
W. Goetschel

Fall, Wednesdays 3-5 pm

This course examines central theoretical issues in Critical Theory with particular attention to the role that the “Frankfurt School” and its affiliates such as Benjamin, Kracauer, Horkheimer, Adorno, and others play in the context of modern German social and cultural thought. In France, thinkers like Foucault and Derrida respond to this tradition and enrich it. The course explores in which way the continuing dialogue between these thinkers informs current critical approaches to rethinking issues and concerns such as theorizing modernity, culture, secularization, multiculturalism, difference, and alterity.

 

COL5096H – The Problem of Translation: Historical, Theoretical, and Pragmatic Persectives

M. Revermann

Winter, Friday 12-2 pm

Translation Studies is a young field that has gained considerable momentum over the past 20 or so years (especially with the emergence of Postcolonial Studies). Comparatist by nature, translation is a good a gateway as any into the discipline of Comparative Literature and some of its principal concerns.

This course will combine the historical, theoretical and pragmatic dimension of translation (all of which overlap to a certain extent). On the historical side, there will be detailed and historically contextualized study of some main reflections on the problem of translation (including texts by Schleiermacher, Benjamin, Venuti and Apter) as well as specific broader case studies of the translation history of certain works (including the Bible, Virgil and Sophocles). For the theoretical dimension Munday (2008) will serve as a guide to a critical discussion of particular approaches and models developed by current Translation Studies. The litmus test will be the pragmatic dimension: hands-on, detailed and theoretically informed analyses of specific translations (usually short passages), mostly to be chosen and presented by the seminar participants themselves.

 

DEPARTMENT OF EAST ASIAN STUDIES

For further information on graduate courses offered by Department of East Asian Studies please visit their website. The following courses are accurate as of June 2019.

 

EAS2020HF Critical Approaches to East Asia

G. Sanders
Fall, Wednesdays 3-5 pm

 

EAS1475H Contemporary Cultural Theories: Worlds, Worlding, Globalization

M. Cho
Winter, Tuesdays 1-3 pm

 

EAS1468HS – Mahayana Sutra Literature

A. Goodman
Mondays, 1-3 pm

 

ENGLISH

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of English please visit their website.

 

SCHOOL OF THE ENVIRONMENT

For further information on graduate courses offered by the School of the Environment please visit their website.

 

HISTORY

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of History please visit their website.

 

HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology please visit their website.

 

ITALIAN STUDIES

ITA1736HF – Working with Pre-Modern Italian Texts: from Transcription to Translation

K. Eisenbichler
Mon & Tues 4-5pm, NF231

This is an experiential learning course that will be structured and conducted as a workshop. In the fall of 2019, the course will focus on early modern editions of sacre rappresentazioni (religious plays) in order to discuss and practice transcribing from sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century published texts, translating such texts into English, and providing a critical apparatus for the translations (introduction, bibliography, footnotes). The course will begin with a discussion of early modern Italian handwriting (paleography), type-faces, scribal abbreviations, grammar, and vocabulary; it will then turn into an experiential learning workshop that will see graduate and senior undergraduate students work together to transcribe early modern Italian texts into modern notation, translate them into English, and create a scholarly apparatus to accompany their English translation.

 

FACULTY OF LAW

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Faculty of Law please visit their website.

 

MEDIEVAL STUDIES

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Centre for Medieval Studies please visit their website.

 

NEAR AND MIDDLE EASTERN CIVILIZATIONS

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies please visit their website.

 

PHILOSOPHY

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of Philosophy please visit their website.

 

SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND JOINT CENTRE FOR BIOETHICS

For further information on graduate courses offered by Joint Centre for Bioethics please visit their website.

 

SOCIOLOGY

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Department of Sociology please visit their website.

Toronto School of Theology Courses

For further information on graduate courses offered by the Toronto School of Theology please visit their website.

TST courses in the 5000 series taught by DSR Cross Appointed Faculty should be taken as RLG4001H and other TST courses must be taken as a Directed Reading Course using the code RLG1501/RLG1502. A Directed Reading Course Form should be completed for all TST courses.

Language Courses

Arabic

 

Aramaic

 

French

FSL 6000HF Reading French Course for Graduate Students

Instructor TBA

This course is designed to develop students’ reading skills particularly as they pertain to research interests. Some remedial grammar, but the primary emphasis is on comprehension of a wide variety of texts in French. Open to Masters and PhD graduate students who need to fulfill their graduate language requirement. On a case by case basis, students with prior language qualifications can access the exam-only option (still with course registration) after prior screening by the home department in support of the exam-only option. A grade of Credit/NonCredit (70% is the minimum grade for CR) will be entered on their transcripts. Students are not permitted to audit this course.

FSL 6000HS Reading French Course for Graduate Students

This course is designed to develop students’ reading skills particularly as they pertain to research interests. Some remedial grammar, but the primary emphasis is on comprehension of a wide variety of texts in French. Open to Masters and PhD graduate students who need to fulfill their graduate language requirement. On a case by case basis, students with prior language qualifications can access the exam-only option (still with course registration) after prior screening by the home department in support of the exam-only option. A grade of Credit/NonCredit (70% is the minimum grade for CR) will be entered on their transcripts. Students are not permitted to audit this course.

German

GER6000HF Reading German for Graduate Students

In this course German reading knowledge is taught following the grammar-translation method designed for graduate students from the Humanities. It is an intensive course that covers German grammar with focus on acquiring essential structures of the German language to develop translation skills. The course is conducted in English, and consequently participants do not learn how to speak or write in German, but rather the course focuses exclusively on reading and translating German. Prior knowledge of German not mandatory. By the end of the course, students should be able to handle a broad variety of texts in single modern Standard German. This course is not intended for MA or PhD students in German.

GER6000HS Reading German for Graduate Students

Instructor TBA

In this course German reading knowledge is taught following the grammar-translation method designed for graduate students from the Humanities. It is an intensive course that covers German grammar with focus on acquiring essential structures of the German language to develop translation skills. The course is conducted in English, and consequently participants do not learn how to speak or write in German, but rather the course focuses exclusively on reading and translating German. Prior knowledge of German not mandatory. By the end of the course, students should be able to handle a broad variety of texts in single modern Standard German. This course is not intended for MA or PhD students in German.

Greek

GRK101H1F Introductory Ancient Greek I (formerly GRK100Y1)

An intensive introduction to Ancient Greek for students who have no knowledge of the language; preparation for the reading of Ancient Greek literature.

 

GRK102H1S Introductory Ancient Greek II

A continuation of the intensive introduction to Ancient Greek in GRK 101H1. Also appropriate for students who have some training in Ancient Greek, but have not completed a whole credit course at University or a final-year (Grade 12) course in secondary school.

 

GRK201H1F Intermediate Ancient Greek I

Reading of selections of Ancient Greek prose works with systematic language study.

GRK202H1S Intermediate Ancient Greek II

Continued language training with readings in Ancient Greek prose and verse.

GRK430H1F Advanced Greek Language

A course designed to enhance language skills. Prose composition, sight translation, stylistic analysis of classical Greek prose.

Latin

LAT101H1F Introductory Latin I (formerly LAT 100Y1)

An intensive introduction to Latin for students who have no knowledge of the language; preparation for the reading of Latin literature.

 

LAT102H1S Introductory Latin II

A continuation of the intensive introduction to Latin in LAT 101H1. Also appropriate for students who have some training in Latin, but have not completed a whole credit course at University or a final-year (Grade 12) course in secondary school.

 

MST 1000Y

Medieval Latin I

MST 1001Y Medieval Latin II

 

Persian

Updated July 3, 2019
View our archive of past graduate courses.